When you wake up in the morning, are you ready to take on the day, or do you want to pull the covers up over your head and crawl into a cave?

As noted in a recent  New York Times  article, “Why You Hate Work,” a 2013 Harvard Business Review study of 12,115 white-collar workers revealed that 70% of workers do not have time for creative or strategic thinking at work, and 50% do not find meaning and significance in their workplace.

This problem of finding purpose or engagement at work affects all white-collar workers, including physicians in nearly every specialty and field. A pioneer in burnout research, Christina Maslach defines burnout as a three-dimensional syndrome made up of exhaustion, cynicism, and lack of sense of meaning and accomplishment. Does any of this resonate for you or the physicians you know?

As a physician coach, I have worked with many clients suffering from physician burnout who are not only dissatisfied in their work, but feel disillusioned and without purpose.

I recently worked with a mid-career neurologist who was frustrated by the never-ending changes in her workplace. It seemed as if the rules changed by the week, with hard-to-understand updates to the EMR,  and rotating practice managers, one more challenging to work with than the next. My client became so lost in frustration and negativity that she wondered why she was even practicing medicine anymore.

Engagement is the antithesis of physician burnout, and is defined as a positive, fulfilling, state of mind characterized by vigor, dedication, and a sense of flow in one’s day.

The New York Times article points out that employees are more satisfied and productive when their foundational needs are met, including creativity, value, and a sense of connection and purpose at work.

When engaged, white collar employees are more motivated, feel more personally invested, and tend to become absorbed in their work. When they come up against challenges, they are inspired to find creative ways to problem-solve. In addition, these employees find greater work-life balance, and have an overall sense of optimism and happiness. This is critical for physicians, given that they experience levels of burnout of 30-60%.

Engagement is increasingly recognized as vital for self-determination and productivity in the workplace. Organizations that encourage employee engagement  are experiencing higher profits, improved safety records, and higher retention rates. Simple workplace measure such as providing breaks and acknowledging hard work can go a long way in increasing  engagement.

Through physician coaching, my neurologist client experienced renewed motivation to effect change in her workplace.  She pushed leadership to develop a wellness committee. We worked on many strategies to help her manage the changes and stresses of her position. Over time, she learned to focus more on her strengths, celebrate small daily accomplishments, and gradually re-engage.

If you find yourself overcome by disengagement and burnout, please check out my new FREE ebook, Building Your Resilient Self: 52 Tips to Move from Physician Burnout to Balance. I created this resource specifically for physicians. In the book you’ll find specific strategies to prevent and counter physician burnout.